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Here is our latest addition in the series of Chat with Service intellect. This month we had an opportunity to converse with David Gedlicka, CEO at Porsche Finance Group Romania. He shared with us his opinion on Role of Customer Experience in success of any organization. Find our coversation with him below:

  What differentiates you from your competitors? How can you stand out from the crowd? Look hard into what your organization provides: your products and services, your delivery systems, your employee’s attitudes and the way you build relationships with customers. But what truly differentiates your organization from the rest? Customers today are not just buying

A friend of mine, the Head of a Middle School, wrote the following as part of his weekly letter to parents. He is working hard to balance change and innovation demanded by modern times with the tradition and process long revered in student education. His message also rings true for service innovation in business and government organizations:

“When Brazil defeated Italy in 1970 for their third World Cup in 12 years, football aficionados claimed it was the greatest team ever with the greatest player ever, Pele. Four years later, it was the West Germans who defeated the Dutch in Munich to seize the World Cup, led by their brilliant defenseman, Franz Beckenbauer.

When considering quality of service around the world, many stereotypes can be applied. We may think certain countries or cultures naturally excel at service, while others are very efficient but not very friendly. And we may even see some countries where service appears to be an altogether low priority. Yet while stereotypes persist – and may have basis in personal experience – I have accumulated more and more experience in countries across the globe, and everywhere I teach and travel, I observe 3 things we all have in common:

1. Service expectations are local.

How people understand and evaluate service, especially front line customer service, is based on the world they live in every day. We judge the service we receive by comparing it to our own experience. This everyday experience varies widely for people from Nairobi to Shanghai to Delhi to Seattle. Defining service excellence is relative to what we experience around us.

Especially during the busy holiday season, customers wait on hold for an eternity. Complaints go unanswered. Salespeople and customer service providers seem more like Scrooge than Santa’s helpers. If you think customer service has taken a nosedive, you’re right, says Ron Kaufman—but there’s a lot you can do to change that. Read on for his tips for being a better customer.

I recently stayed at the Banyan Tree resort in Macau. This was my first time staying with the 5-star Banyan Tree group. All I knew was that the Macau property is a high-rise urban resort in the city with modern living, unlike the other Banyan Tree resorts built with nature-filled living and relaxation. I expected to indulge and be pampered with service excellence – as I would in any other hotel of equal standing.

When I arrived at check-in, the staff member mentioned my name in a tone and style that made me like feel they had been waiting just for me. That felt good, especially after a long flight and drive to reach the destination.

What are the major challenges leaders and organizations must overcome to build a competitive advantage with a strong and sustainable service culture? New video – 2.5 minutes. Watch it now.

Indian telecommunications is one of the most commoditized, competitive, and chaotic markets in the world. Hundreds of stores sell identical phones and tablets. Price competition is intense. Customers are spoiled for choice. In this challenging market, one company consistently charges higher prices, but has also enjoyed sustained growth and profitability over decades. How can this

Q: In your opinion, what are some key differences in Indian service culture compared to global practices?
A: The volume of people in India both – as service providers and customers – has an impact on the way people think about service in the country. With such an enormous number of available people, there is a common sense that talent is replaceable, and customers are, too.

So employers, don’t put as much effort into attracting, keeping and growing their employees as their counterparts do in other developed countries. There seems to be an ease or an acceptance that people come and go…and someone new is always coming. But over a long term the danger of this view is that people do come and go, and the human resource department focuses on getting more on new hires rather than retaining the best people as colleagues.

A similar problem exists in relation to providing customer service. With so many people to serve as potential customers, companies don’t put in
as much effort to retain the loyalty of those they have. Continuous customer churn tends to be the norm, while providing truly excellent customer service is the rare exception.

The “Smarter Services Executive Symposium” in Boston was a deep dive into the world of services, service providers, and field service engineers. The depth of sharing was impressive, as was the depth of expertise.

I gave one keynote presentation and took fourteen pages of notes. Here are my “top twelve take-aways” from the event. Which one is most relevant for you?